THE CITY AND THE WATER’S EDGE COMPETITION: KRVIA@25

WHAT: Cities have had a very strong relationship with bodies of water. Many were built on the banks of rivers, some were at the seaside, others were adjacent to lakes and of course in many cases cities created their own lakes and reservoirs. No city could afford to disregard the collection, storage, use-pattern and disposal of water. Water-bodies served as modes of transportation or defense; they supported livelihoods and crafts; they created open spaces that served as a release from the confines of urban congestion. In many ways water was intimately connected with the very idea of being alive. Though cities were man-made artifacts, humans felt a sense of being grateful beneficiaries, and sometimes unwitting victims, of this capricious natural element. Water, in its presence as well as absence, was both a blessing and a threat. Thus water was not just a physical fact, it was a deep psychological presence.

While water is essential to life, its proximity to human habitation needs systems of maintenance and upkeep. Away from human settlements, bodies of water can find ways of self-regeneration, involving a multiplicity of organisms that constantly balance the state of the fluid medium. Human populations however, use water, create wastes, and are vulnerable to the organisms that water may support. Thus human societies need to create rules, laws, customs and regulatory mechanisms to maintain this vital resource. Symbolism, religion and ethics are connected to every society’s conception of water, as are law, economics and politics.

The articulation of the edge of water in human settlements was the clearest expression of all these concepts. It afforded particular and peculiar modes of use and control, different in each society and even in each case. Sometimes hardened and built, sometimes covered with vegetation, sometimes showing the exposed soil or sand, each edge was made to answer to particular conditions, concepts and needs.

With the huge and rapid growth of population, as well as with increased and more dense urbanisation, the traditional modes of dealing with water are seriously challenged. We will have to find new ways of dealing with water in cities, and the edge where water and human settlements meet is critical. Thinking of the “edge” means of course reimagining the relationship of humans and water, reimagining the mechanisms of participation and control, reimagining the environmental and technological issues and suggesting new arrangements. In short thinking about the edge of the water means no less than reimagining city and community.Cities have had a very strong relationship with bodies of water. Many were built on the banks of rivers, some were at the seaside, others were adjacent to lakes and of course in many cases cities created their own lakes and reservoirs. No city could afford to disregard the collection, storage, use-pattern and disposal of water. Water-bodies served as modes of transportation or defence; they supported livelihoods and crafts; they created open spaces that served as a release from the confines of urban congestion. In many ways water was intimately connected with the very idea of being alive. Though cities were man-made artefacts, humans felt a sense of being grateful beneficiaries, and sometimes unwitting victims, of this capricious natural element. Water, in its presence as well as absence, was both a blessing and a threat! Thus water was not just a physical fact, it was a deep psychological presence.

VIEW/DOWNLOAD THE COMPETITION FLYER HERE

ELIGIBILITY
The competition is open to multidisciplinary teams of professionals and/or students with at least one member from India. Each team should have a minimum of three members, at least one of whom must be an architect/urban designer/landscape architect, while the others may belong to other disciplines.

CRITERIA
Each participant team is invited to select a place in their city where water and human settlement meet.

Participants are required to study the context and propose measures to integrate the selected edge into the life of the city. The Design Proposal should exhibit an understanding of ecological, social and cultural characteristics of the place. The edge should become part of the “commons”, inclusive of all and available for public uses. Proposals can suggest uses or prohibit them, and would accordingly need architectural articulation to support this.

There are no limitations to scale, but an urbanistic/landscape/architectural intervention would need to demonstrate the character of place imagined.

Studies and information to back up the Design Proposal will form an important part of the judging process.

IMPORTANT DATES

Announcement of Competition 20th September 2016
Last date of registration 30th November 2016
Last date for submitting queries 15th December 2016
Last date of issuing answers to queries 23rd December 2016
Last date and time of submitting entries online By 12 noon on 7th January 2017
Last date for receiving hard copies of entries at KRVIA By 3 pm on 14th January 2017
Judging of Entries, Announcement of 10 Short Listed entries 21st January 2017
Presentations by the 10 short listed and the Announcement of Winning Entries 14th February 2017
Concluding Conference 15th February 2017

PANEL OF JUDGES
Eminent Architect and educator B. V. Doshi , S. Vishwanath of Rainwater Club, Sandeep Virmani, Director of Hunnarshala Foundation, will form the panel of judges.

REGISTRATION
To know the entire details of registration, follow this link: http://115.248.145.172/competition/register.html

REGISTRATION FEES
Professionals: Rs 5000/- payable by demand draft in favour of Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture and Environmental Studies or by RTGS as mentioned here

Students: Free

PRIZES

First Prize Rs. 1,50,000/-
Second Prize Rs. 1,00,000/-
3 Honorable Mentions Rs. 50,000/- per team

First and Second Prize Winning teams will be invited to present their findings and projects at the Conference at Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute for Architecture, Mumbai.

The Competition organisers will bear the expenses for travel and stay at Mumbai on those dates for one member of the team, from within India.
Teams awarded Honourable Mention will also be welcome to present their projects at the Conference.

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

1. This is an IDEAS competition. Competing teams should bear this in mind when preparing concepts and presentation.

2. Each team will submit a maximum of three A2 sheets (portrait format) that can include an explanatory text of not more than 500 words.

3. In addition teams may submit a video of not more than one minute duration on a DVD.

4. The documents / drawings will only be identified by the six figure code(e.g.123456/text.doc) which will be given to the competitor(s) on completion of registration, 10mm high, appearing in the top right hand corner of each document / drawing / DVD. The participants will not reveal their identity by writing their names anywhere on the document / drawing / DVD submitted.

5. All online submissions (drawings / documents / video) should arrive on krvia_25competition@krvia.ac.in before 12 noon, on the 15th December 2016. The video, if part of the submission, should be uploaded to the participant’s Google Drive account and a download link should be emailed at the above email address.

6. All drawings submitted online should have a resolution of 300 DPI.

7. All submissions in hard copy (drawings / documents / videos) have to reach the address mentioned below before 3pm on the 25th December, 2016

Kamla Raheja Institute for Architecture & Environmental Studies,
Vidyanidhi Bhavan II, Vidyanidhi Marg,
JVPD Scheme, Vile Parle West,
Mumbai 400 049, Maharashtra,
INDIA

8. It is mandatory for all teams to submit in both modes, i.e online as well as hard copy.


INFORMATION
All details on  http://115.248.145.172/competition/index.html


 

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